Farmstead record WLW 101 - Farmstead: Green Farm

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Summary

Green Farm, Walsham-le-Willows. 19th century farmstead and 16th century farmhouse. Loose courtyard two-sided plan formed by working agricultural buildings, with additional detached elements. The farmhouse is set away from the yard. Significant loss (over 50%) of the traditional farm buildings. Located within a loose farmstead cluster.

Location

Grid reference Centred TM 0195 7129 (56m by 84m)
Map sheet TM07SW
Civil Parish WALSHAM-LE-WILLOWS, MID SUFFOLK, SUFFOLK

Map

Type and Period (5)

Full Description

Farm buildings at Green Farm which include a 16th C timber-framed and rendered farmhouse, with a 17th C cross wing and diamond mullioned windows. Also present is a 19th C brick and flint 5 bay barn with a clasped purlin roof (S1).

The stable range is a non-designated heritage asset dating to the c.1830s. The building is the last remaining farm building of the historical farmstead of Green Farm in Walsham-Le-Willows. The farmyard was separated from the farmhouse during the 20th century and now forms part of the lands associated with the adjacent Cranmer Lodge Farm. The building is visible on the 1842 Tithe Apportionments and served as a stable and cowshed. Originally it had an L-shaped footprint which extended into the rear garden of the farmhouse. The footprint had changed by the 1882 OS map , it appears that the north boundary between the yard and house was moved northwards, in line with the edge of the stable range. A narrower single storey range was constructed on the north gable end of the stable range, this formed part of the garden enclosure. The earlier L-shaped footprint of the building was now rectangular following he demolition of the structure attached to the south west corner of the west elevation of the stable range. A small lean-to structure was added to the north-west corner of the west elevation of the building. A smaller enclosure was formed between the barn and the stable range. The layout of the farmyard and farm buildings appear to have remained unchanged between 1882 and 1904. It appears that by 1977 an open fronted shelter shed was constructed at the north-east corner of the main barn along with an additional range parallel to the north boundary of the farmyard. This range was attached to the stable range on the east elevation and extended eastwards to the open shelter sheds which was constructed on the west elevation of the barn. The flint barn was destroyed in 1987 by a storm, however, the lower part of the barn walls are still insitu as well as most of the farmyard boundary walls.

The stable range was constructed prior to 1842. The timber frame of the range was constructed out of mostly reused timbers which are seated on a high plinth wall. The frame assembly and carpentry of the timber frame is of a lower standard but typical for this period. The character of the building suggests that the structure was constructed closer to the 1830s. The range is divided into two sections which is separated by a full height timber framed partition. Both sections of the stable range were accessed through single doorways in the east elevation of the barn. The existing doorways are in their original locations, however, the doorway leading into the north end of the building was subsequently enlarged. Neither of the existing doors are original. The barn was clad with lapped weatherboarding. It appears that a large proportion of the original boarding has survived with some repairs to the east elevation of the building. At the north end of the east elevation some of the boards were omitted to accommodate a ventilation strip. This area was covered with slats. The floor at both ends of the building were laid with bricks set on edge which have an east to west orientation. Some remnants of timber feeding troughs can be seen at the south end of the building. The south side of the north section of the building was used as a tack store at some stage as there are timber props for horse harnesses attached to the walls. The roof over the stable range consists of a clasped side purlin roof which was covered with clay pantiles. The plinth wall of the building was constructed out of brick and flint rubble. There is evidence of both 19th and 20th century repairs to plinth wall, however, it is largely complete and in good condition.

Green Farm, Walsham-le-Willows. 19th century farmstead and 16th century farmhouse. Loose courtyard two-sided plan formed by working agricultural buildings, with additional detached elements. The farmhouse is set away from the yard. Significant loss (over 50%) of the traditional farm buildings. Located within a loose farmstead cluster (S3-S8).

Recorded as part of the Farmsteads in the Suffolk Countryside Project. This is a purely desk-based study and no site visits were undertaken. These records are not intended to be a definitive assessment of these buildings. Dating reflects their presence at a point in time on historic maps and there is potential for earlier origins to buildings and farmsteads. This project highlights a potential need for a more in depth field study of farmstead to gather more specific age data.

Sources/Archives (8)

  • <S1> Unpublished document: Aitkens, P and Wade-Martins, S.. 1998. The Farmsteads of Suffolk. A Thematic Study.
  • <S2> Unpublished document: Joubert, N.. 2017. Heritage Asset Assessment: Stable Block at Green Farmhouse, Cranmer Green, Walsham-le-Willows.
  • <S3> Unpublished document: Campbell, G., and McSorley, G. 2019. SCCAS: Farmsteads in the Suffolk Countryside Project.
  • <S4> Map: Ordnance Survey. 1880s. Ordnance Survey 25 inch to 1 mile map, 1st edition.
  • <S5> Map: Ordnance Survey. c 1904. Ordnance Survey 25 inch to 1 mile map, 2nd edition. 25".
  • <S6> Vertical Aerial Photograph: various. Google Earth.
  • <S7> Map: Ordnance Survey. 1949. Ordnance Survey 6 inch to 1, mile, 3rd edition. 1:10,560.
  • <S8> Map: 1843. Walsham-Le-Willows Tithe Map.

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Protected Status/Designation

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Related Events/Activities (2)

Record last edited

May 21 2021 2:21PM

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