Monument record IPS 240 - The Albany, Tuddenham Road, Ipswich, (IAS 8513).

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Summary

A programme of archaeological works, including the excavation of two areas covering a total of c.1300 square metres and the monitoring ofthe groundworks associated with the construction of fifty nine houses on the c.3.75 site known as The Albany, Ipswich, recovered evidence dating to the Iron Age, Roman, medieval and post-medieval periods.

Location

Grid reference Centred TM 174 459 (285m by 289m) (Centred on)
Map sheet TM14NE
Civil Parish IPSWICH, IPSWICH, SUFFOLK

Map

Type and Period (3)

Full Description

1991: A programme of archaeological works, including the excavation of two areas covering a total of c.1300 square metres and the monitoring ofthe groundworks associated with the construction of fifty nine houses on the c.3.75 site known as The Albany, Ipswich, recovered evidence dating to the Iron Age, Roman, medieval and post-medieval periods.

The site, although not itself occupied until the 1st century, produced evidence of Late Iron Age activity and was probably peripheral to an occupation site ofthat period. The occupation on the site itself became progressively Romanised from its beginnings in the 1st century until its apparent abandonment in the late 3rd or early 4th centuries. Only limited structural remains of buildings were identified during the excavations, although the entrance to a substantial enclosed area was recorded, along with a surrounding contemporary field system. Although not interpreted as a high status site, the presence of samian ware, particularly 2nd century types, and other fine wares, suggested that a moderate degree of affluence was attained by what was probably a small rural farming community which adapted well to Roman influence. A metal detector survey recovered metalwork of Roman date along with a number of medieval coins dating between the late 12th to mid-14th centuries suggesting a hitherto unsuspected phase of activity on the site. The inclusion of a high proportion of cut halfpennies and cut farthings among the medieval coins is significant, as is the fact that no features of this date were identified during the excavations. In addition the medieval ceramic evidence was limited to a few unstratified surface finds, predominantly from the south and south-west sides of the development area with no associated features identified. One possible explanation is that The Albany area may have been the site of a minor fair during the medieval period which has not left any documentary trace.

In addition sixteen post-medieval coins were recovered dating from the mid-16th early 17th centuries which were interpreted as evidence for a further minor phase of activity on the site, possibly a single event, as all of the coins could have been in circulation together early in the 17th century, (S1).

See also (S2-S5).

Sources/Archives (7)

  • --- Article in serial: Newman J. 1994. A possible Medieval Fair Site at the Albany, Ipswich.
  • <S1> Unpublished document: Boulter S. 1996. Excavation Report, The Albany (IPS 240)..
  • <S2> Article in serial: Martin, E.A., Pendleton, C. & Plouviez, J.. 1992. Archaeology in Suffolk 1991. XXXVII (4).
  • <S3> Article in serial: Ipswich Archaeological Trust. 1991. Ipswich Archaeological Trust News, 34, June 1991. Ipswich Archaeol Trust News, 34, June 1991.
  • <S4> Index: Suffolk County Council Archaeological Service. 1974. Ipswich Archaeological Survey Card Index (digital version).. IAS 8513.
  • <S5> Index: Suffolk Archaeology Unit. 1974. SAU index card and Archive. IAS 8513.
  • <S6> Finds Report: 1998. The Albany, Copper alloy belt mount and key fragment..

Finds (33)

Protected Status/Designation

  • None recorded

Related Monuments/Buildings (2)

Related Events/Activities (3)

Record last edited

Jun 5 2017 2:27PM

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